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Friday, 30 September 2016

Optimism Can Enhance Your Long-Term Health

Thistle.

Optimism Can Enhance Your Long-Term Health
 Gina Roberts-Grey

A positive attitude and overall emotional wellness can help boost mental fitness at any age.
It's a well-known fact that being optimistic and focusing on emotional wellness
seems to reduce stress. But did you know that a glass-half-full kind of attitude can offer even more tangible health benefits? Research has found, for instance, that an upbeat attitude,
or happiness, can help lessen the burden of chronic pain, say from arthritis,
or even reduce your chances of developing cardiovascular disease.
In fact, some experts now think that staying positive can help you live longer.
In an intriguing study done at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota,
 researchers followed a group of people for 30 years. They found that those who were originally classified as "optimistic" on a standard personality test turned out to be 20 percent less likely
to suffer an early death than those classified as "pessimistic."

Opt for a Good Mood, Opt to Live Longer 
Happiness plays a pretty important role in keeping your brain healthy and vital, too.
Staying positive, say experts, helps fight the "blues."
This is good news in terms of longevity since, among other factors,
depression has been shown to increase a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
According to Marion Somers, PhD, a geriatric-care manager in Brooklyn, New York, an optimistic outlook isn't hard to achieve, and doing a few simple "optimism exercises" can yield a big reward. "Optimism exercises don't have to be formal," she says. "You can [improve] your attitude
just by taking a brisk walk, petting your dog, or playing with your grandchildren outside.
" Anything that lets you release pent-up negativity and experience calm, peaceful thoughts
can go a long way toward helping you become — and stay — more positive.

Training Your Brain to Stay Positive
There are also some specific activities you can undertake to boost your brain's vitality.
The ancient practice of yoga, research has found, can improve your cognitive function,
including your memory. Registered yoga instructor Jennifer Edwards in New York City says, "Practicing yoga trains your brain to stay focused." It requires you to concentrate on your body's movement in space and the actual mechanics of your breathing, while tuning out distractions.
"That focusing," says Edwards, "can improve your brain's ability to function during the day."
Yoga also promotes relaxation and eases stress, something David Eagleman, PhD, neuroscientist
and assistant professor in the department of neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, says is very good for your brain's overall health and vitality. "Stress can wear down your brain's cognitive abilities. So anything you can do to eliminate stress will help keep your brain sharp."
"Another powerful tool to rev up your brain's vitality is meditation. This technique clears your mind and lets you concentrate on being peaceful," says Dr. Somers. Scientists agree.
Researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, found regular meditation sessions
slowed the normal age-related decline of brain cells. And according to Harvard researchers,
daily meditation also reduced normal age-related thinning in regions of the brain
thought to be involved in integrating emotional and cognitive processes.
Somers says activities like yoga and meditation, which require concentration and focus,
are good for your brain in indirect ways, too. "We breathe every day, but, consciously
and deliberately thinking about breathing while meditating or doing yoga increases lung function," she says. That increased lung function boosts oxygen levels in blood that circulates
through your body, including to your brain.
Says Somers, "Oxygen-rich blood keeps the brain healthy and increases alertness."

A Vital Spirit, a Lengthy Life
Participating in religious or spiritual activities can also keep your brain humming along
more smoothly. "The rituals of religious services and the social elements of being part
of a congregation stimulate your brain," says Somers. "The sense of belonging
and being able to connect with others who share your beliefs heightens alertness,
which keeps your brain engaged in daily activities."
Being spiritual or religious can also perk up your mental outlook.
British researchers found seniors with chronic diseases who attend religious services or who pray
on their own showed a greater level of optimism about their overall health than those who did not.
You don't necessarily have to leave your house or attend formal religious services for your brain
to soak up the benefits of spirituality, however. Somers says the concentration and focus required
to pray anywhere — in your home, your car, or your shower — and to live a life that's in line with your spiritual beliefs, is really what has the most positive influence on your brain over the long term.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/longevity/enhancing-your-life.aspx

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later

You can pre-read all your course material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               Personal business development.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com        just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Saturday, 24 September 2016

Man vs earth




Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneous recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               Personal business development.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com        just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Sunday, 18 September 2016

Listen Instead of Correcting Others: What We Gain and Give

Hawthorn blossom.

Listen Instead of Correcting Others: What We Gain and Give
By David Munger

“When you judge another, you do not define them. You define yourself.” ~Wayne Dyer

I have a tendency to want to show off what I know, and in the worst cases, correct other people.
Instead of listening and connecting I unconsciously try to sell to others an image of myself
that I wish to project. Some part of me believes that if people are impressed with me
then they’ll like me and be interested in my knowledge and point of view.
In this way I fall into the trap of constructing the false self.
This is the person I wish for others to see, a person without vulnerabilities, incorrect knowledge,
or who makes mistakes. A thing that is more of a product than a person.
Many of us fashion these false selves not only as an idealized version of ourselves,
but also to keep other people’s judgments of us at bay. Before we realize what has happened,
we have made our skills and knowledge into weapons that we wield on others while all the while
we hide our true selves behind a shield. Without planning to, we have declared war.
The constructed, false self is a one-way gate. Like a character in a stage play,
the false self puts sights and sounds out to the audience while all the while it stands behind
the fourth wall of separation from the observers.
The audience sees the character, but the character doesn’t see the audience.
I have someone in my life who deals with a fairly severe mental illness.
Through most of my life I have tried to help him by showing him what was “wrong” with his thinking and actions. I wanted to use my logic and knowledge to set his perceptions straight.
I didn’t realize it at the time, but I was mostly lecturing him. I did not listen and understand
his point of view, but instead stayed behind my shield and wielded my weapons of logic at him.
I thought I was being a good influence.
Constructive influence, though, flows through positive human connections.
When we judge others we sever those connections and directly destroy our chances
of influencing others with our best information and ideas.
But real, positive influence travels in both directions.
Discovering wisdom works best as a collaboration formed through the conduit of relationships. There is give and take and neither person needs to be “the right one.”
When we give others space to make mistakes, to have different skills and expertise than our own, then we also give ourselves space for the same things. No one of us is an expert at everything,
but when we come together we close the gaps into a working whole.
A few years ago, while preparing for a volunteer program, I took some training in listening.
I learned that it’s more valuable to reflect back what people say,
and to show understanding of them without judgment.
I learned that if I showed understanding of the other person’s feelings and thoughts,
that alone would ease their burden and do worlds of good.
I learned that acceptance and understanding aren’t necessarily the same things as 
approval and agreement.
We needn’t be afraid that we are compromising our own views or knowledge
when we simply choose to understand another’s.
In fact, the openness of understanding can strengthen our own point of view.
We must receive what we wish to give and give what we wish to receive.
If we want to be listened to, then we must listen to others.
If we want to be valued for what we know, then we must value others for what they know.
And if we want to be forgiven and loved, then we must forgive and love others.
Lately I’ve been applying my new listening skills in conversations with my mentally ill loved one.
I allow myself to relate to difficult things he experiences and have even tried to be brave enough
to be honest when I see a bit of myself in him, when I see the same passions, fears, and mistakes.
The funny thing is that by backing off I’ve gained more of his trust.
By not pretending to have all the answers for him, I’ve strengthened our bond.
Now I only give him my opinion if he asks for it.
Sometimes this comes after a long spell of silence, when we are simply being together.
And I’m honest enough to tell him when I don’t have a clue how to answer his question.
And you know, I’ve learned a whole lot from him, too.

Dave Munger is a software user interface designer living and working in Chicago.
In his spare time he screws things up and learns a lot from fixing them.
It’s a hobby. He recently launched his own blog at inneryonder.com.

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               Personal business development.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com         just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Monday, 12 September 2016

Understanding The Authentic Self - Discovering Who You Really Are

  Vetch.



Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com      gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go."

Tuesday, 6 September 2016

How to Turn Off Negative Thoughts in Your Mind

Spear thistle and blackberry leaves.

How to Turn Off Negative Thoughts in Your Mind
Rita Schulte

Barring psychological illness, we are all largely responsible for our own emotional health
and well-being. What does that mean? That what we say to ourselves over and over for days,
weeks, months, and sometimes years, has a dramatic effect on how we see ourselves.
This also contributes to many of the mental health disorders we see rampant today:
what we choose to have continually playing in our brains stays there, and there’s a  real problem when we start buying into the negative thoughts we have about ourselves.
I discovered how powerful the effect of conditioning is firsthand when I was listening to
some oldies the other day on the radio—I was amazed at how quickly I could belt out the words
to songs I hadn’t heard in decades. How could I remember all those lyrics from so long ago?
Because I was conditioned by them. I listened and sang those words day in and day out
for what seemed like forever, until they were burned into my brain cells, and some of those
old songs even provoked strong feelings in me as I took a quick trip down memory lane.
The mind is a powerful thing, and in a nanosecond,
it can elevate or crush our mood because of the beliefs lurking behind our feelings.
If you think I’m kidding, try it yourself: think of an old song, or even the lyrics to one
of your favorite television shows.
Those of us who are old enough can belt out the opening line to The Beverly Hillbillies in our sleep.
So, what does all this have to do with our emotional health? Everything.
Many of us have problems with negative thoughts playing on the channel of our minds,
but if you’re engaging in it consistently, and you believe it, it could be eroding your sense of
self-esteem. Here are a few beliefs that indicate you may need to switch the station:
I’m a loser
I’m not good enough
I don’t deserve….
No one likes me
I suck at relationships
I’m a failure
Negative thoughts conjures up bad feelings and hooks you into believing
that what those old tapes in your head are playing is actually true.
In short, it brings your focus to your failures, and that gets you nowhere.

What can you do?
Here are some suggestions:
Notice when that same old song starts playing, and switch the channel
Self-talk is so subtle that we often don’t notice its effect on our mood and belief systems—
as previously noted, one song can conjure up an entire series of thoughts and memories. 
Key things to notice are “if only or “what if” statements: the former keep you stuck in the past
with regret, while the latter keep you fearful of the future. There is nothing you can do about
the past, and the future isn’t here yet, so stay in the present moment.

Visualize the good things
Three scoops of ice cream: chocolate, vanilla, strawberry. Fresh crushed pineapple and strawberries, warm luscious hot fudge. Ripe sweet banana. Fresh whipped cream and a juicy red cherry.
Get the drift? By now, you’re not only thinking of the banana split, you can taste it.
If we want to change the negative tapes playing in our heads, we have to visualize ourselves positively—that means seeing yourself non-judgmentally. Picture accepting yourself.
How would that look? Draw a picture in your mind and expand on it.

Recognize that actions always follow beliefs
Whatever you believe, you’ll experience more of, and you’ll also find yourself behaving in ways
that are congruent with your beliefs. So, start believing the best about yourself:
act as if you believe that you’re a valuable and worthy person.

Pay attention to triggers
Triggers are anything that can start the old tapes playing.
If a certain person is a trigger for you, set boundaries with them.

Develop positive counter statements to refute negative self-talk
Instead of always putting yourself down in your head, think of some things
you actually like about yourself. What are your strengths, what are you good at?
Developing counterstatements requires you have some degree of belief in their veracity.
Keep your counterstatements in the here-and-now, instead of saying “I’m not good enough”
try saying, “I am capable. I’m good at ______. I accept myself the way I am.”
Thinking poorly about ourselves gets us nowhere and is extremely self-limiting.
Decide today to turn off the negative self-talk channel in your mind and develop your true potential.
Back at you: If you’ve struggled with negative thoughts,
how did you overcome it and go on to reach your full potential?

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/how-to-turn-off-negative-thoughts-in-your-mind.html

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneous recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               Personal business development.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com        just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”